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Disability Hate Crime - Reporting Book

Description
This Easy Read Guide from the Home Office in the UK is a guide to Disability Hate Crime and how to Report it. An excellent template for people seeing to create a similar document for use in their own country, it is also an excellent basic source of information covering items such as: Individual's Rights, What Disability Hate Crime and Bullying is. How to go about Reporting it. Staying Strong.
Category
Best practice
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO3

Practices That Address Bullying of Students with Disabilities

Description
The nature of bullying and the proliferation of bully prevention programs for schools is well-documented. Research indicates that the most effective programs are those that are implemented school-wide. Forty-nine states have passed some type of legislation that deals with bully-prevention in schools. Clearly, schools throughout the country are developing and implementing school-wide bullying prevention programs. Yet students continue to be bullied at an alarming rate, with some studies citing figures in excess of 50% (Rose, Monda-Amaya & Espelage, 2001; McNamara, 2013). Students who engage in bullying select those students who are the most vulnerable, including those with special needs. One issue about school-wide programs is that they are frequently inaccessible to all students. Therefore, students with disabilities may never be taught how to deal with bullying. This article provides recommendations that enable schools to modify their school-wide programs so that all students can feel safe in school, including those with special needs.
Category
Best practice
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1

A qualitative exploration of how people with learning disabilities understand and respond to bullying.

Description
Despite reports that people with learning disabilities (PWLD) are more vulnerable to being bullied than the non-LD population, there is a paucity of research into bullying of PWLD. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 adults with LD, using bullying vignettes, to explore how PWLD understand bullying; their knowledge of coping strategies for dealing with bullying; and what PWLD understand the consequences of bullying to be. Interview data was analysed using thematic analysis and categorised into four super-ordinate themes; Bullying is a bad thing; Reasons for the bullying; Coping strategies; and Consequences of own bullying experiences. The findings are discussed in relation to attribution theory (Heider, 1958) and socio-moral reasoning theory (Gibbs, 1979; 2003). Recommendations for clinicians working with PWLD involved in bullying are made; including considering the application of the concept of the “provocative-victim” (Sheard, Clegg, Standen, & Cromby, 2001); exploring how individual’s understanding of bullying experiences in terms of attributions made and socio-moral reasoning; exploring coping strategies and addressing aggressive or avoidance-based strategies, and consequences of bullying such as social and psychological problems. Recommendations are made for future research with larger, more representative samples.
Category
Scientific publication
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1

Talking about bullying

Description
Bullying, disablism, harassment, abuse, mobbing - these are all terms used for actions and words that hurt and belittle other people. Bullying is reported to occur everywhere, but appears to be more often experienced by people with disability (Christensen et al. 2012; McGrath et al, 2010). Up to two-thirds of people with intellectual disability have been bullied at some time, both as children and as adults. People with intellectual disability are sometimes the ones doing the bullying.
Category
Abstract
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1

Differences in Bullying Victimization Between Students With and Without Disabilities

Description
Prevalence rates for bullying victimization among children with disabilities have varied greatly in the research literature. Two reasons for such variability were the focus of this study: (a) rates vary as a function of disability type, and (b) rates vary based on the bullying measure and criteria used to classify students as bullying victims. The sample used in this study consisted of 1,027 parents or guardians of children with disabilities and 11,500 parents or guardians of children without disabilities who reported the frequency with which their children experienced bullying in general and 12 specific behaviors associated with verbal, physical, and social–relational bullying. Prevalence rates and odds ratios (ORs) differed considerably based not only on disability type but also on the classification criteria used.
Category
Research paper
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1

Bullying of children and adolescents with autism spectrum conditions: a ‘state of the field’ review

Description
A ‘state of the field’ review of what is currently known about bullying of children and adolescents with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) is presented. This article highlights compelling evidence that they are considerably more likely to be bullied than those with other or no special educational needs and disabilities.
Category
Article
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1

Exposure to bullying among students with autism spectrum conditions: A multi-informant analysis of risk and protective factors.

Description
Research has consistently shown that children and young people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are more likely to be bullied than those with other or no special educational needs. The aim of the current study was to examine risk and protective factors that could help to explain variation in exposure to bullying within this group.
Category
Research paper
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1

Walk a Mile in Their Shoes - Bullying and the Child with Special Needs

Description
In the U.S. AbilityPath.org is an online hub and special needs community for parents and professionals.
AbilityPath.org created this report and guide to achieve the following:
• Educate all parents on the issue. Both parents and experts shared with AbilityPath.org the limited information
that is available specific to the issues faced by children with special needs.
• Empower parents and educators to take action and apply meaningful change in the classroom and these
children’s lives by providing educational as well as legal options in an effort to prevent and/or fight back
against the actions bullies.
• Assist the actions of policy makers, school administrators and professionals in a team effort to ensure that
this issue is at the forefront in the public arena when bullying is discussed, researched or legislated
Category
Reports
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO3