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Acoso escolar y Necesidades Educativas Especiales

Description
Tesis doctoral que pretende describir, analizar y comparar el acoso y/o maltrato escolar desde el punto de vista de las víctimas, testigos y agresores con y sin Necesidades Educativas Especiales (NEE) en los centros de Extremadura. Entre las conclusiones obtenidas destacan las siguientes: 1) el alumnado-víctima con NEE percibe más frecuencia de acoso que el alumnado sin NEE; 2) el alumnado-testigo expresa que son más frecuentes los de modalidad verbal frente a los de agresión física y agresión indirecta; 3) el alumnado-agresor expresa que los tipos de maltrato más frecuentes son de modalidad verbal destacando los insultos y amenazas como los tipos de agresión más importantes en educación primaria, y en secundaria la exclusión social como la forma de agresión más común, existiendo diferencias significativas entre el alumnado con NEE y sin NEE.
Category
Research paper
Country of origin
Spain
Milestone
IO1

Top tips to stop bullying for teachers

Description
This short film created by the Anti-Bullying Alliance and the Council for Disabled Children in the UK showcases the advice Disabled young people have for teachers and other education professionals, and how they want to be involved in finding solutions to stop bullying in schools and colleges..
Category
video
Country of origin
Other
Milestone
IO4

Cyber bullying among Students with Serious Emotional and Specific Learning Disabilities

Description
This Dutch replicative exploratory study sought to investigate the impact of cyber bullying among the seriously emotional disabled (SED) and specifically learning disabled (SLD) youth ages 12-19 grades 7-12, in comparison with their non-disabled student peers. The study focused on thirty SED and SLD students and 22 students without disabilities. The study found that between four and 9% of SED and SLD students reported bullying or victimization of bullying at least once a week. Significant
associations were found between cyber bullying and IQ, frequency of computer usage and self-esteem and depressive feelings. Additionally, the replicated study also found no associations between cyber bullying and age and gender. Conclusions: There is a limited research on the extent to which cyber bullying among students with SED and the SLD in special education and mainstream settings. Strategies are needed to reduce it and to establish coping mechanisms for the victims. They should also create awareness of the issue to avoid future cases of cyber bullying among this particular age group.
Category
Research paper
Country of origin
Other
Milestone
IO1

Cyberbullying among adults with intellectual disabilities: Some preliminary data

Description
Recent studies show that youth with disabilities are at risk of experiencing cyberbullying. Nevertheless, the nature of this phenomenon among adults with intellectual disabilities
has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this Cross-National study from Spain, Mexico and Chile analyzes the frequency and characteristics of cyberbullying and its correlates in individuals with intellectual disabilities attending training centers for adults with intellectual disabilities.
Category
Newspaper article
Country of origin
Spain
Milestone
IO1

Bullying of youth with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability or typical development Victim and parent perspectives

Description
This American study carried out In-depth interviews conducted separately with 13-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability (ID), or typical development (TD) and their mothers investigated the experiences of victimization in the form of bullying. Higher internalizing problems and conflict in friendships were found to be significant predictors of victimization, according to both youth- and mother-reports. These predictors were found to be more salient than ASD status alone. Implications for practice are discussed.
Category
Research paper
Country of origin
Other
Milestone
IO1

Peer Advocacy

Description
This video feature from Pacer explores insights and advice from students as they respond to situations about bullying. Check back next Wednesday as we continue to discuss advocacy!
Category
Best practice
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO4

Bullying and autism spectrum disorders - A Guide for School Staff

Description
If you work in a mainstream or special needs school, you will inevitably come across instances of bullying from time to time. Pupils with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at particular risk of being bullied. This booklet helps you to understand why this is the case and provides strategies and ideas for promoting understanding of ASDs among staff and pupils, tackling and reducing bullying incidents and supporting pupils with an ASD who have been bullied.
Category
Best practice
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO3

Innovation programs at the workplace for workers with an intellectual disability - Two case studies in large Australian organisations

Description
The purpose of this Australian paper was to examine human resource management (HRM) innovation programs in the early stages of employment for workers with an intellectual disability (WWID). Findings showed that the participants displayed more confidence and independence in their ability and exhibited aspirations to advance and succeed in their roles.
Category
Best practice
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO3

Bullying and Identity Development - Insights from Autistic and Non-Autistic College Students

Description
Reduced cognitive empathy may put autistic people at risk for bullying. This American study compared interpretations of bullying provided by 22 autistic and 15 non-autistic college students. Autistic (and non-autistic) students reported less severe bullying in college relative to earlier in development. Chronic bullying was associated with improvements in self-descriptions and self-acceptance. Autistic students who were chronically bullied were more likely to self-identify as autistic when asked to explain their
disability. Autistic and non-autistic students demonstrated similar levels of cognitive empathy, providing no evidence that a “double empathy problem” contributes to bullying for all autistic individuals. Findings suggest that recovery from bullying can contribute to resilience and that autistic people gain insights about bullying and how to overcome it with development.
Category
Research paper
Country of origin
Ireland
Milestone
IO1